Been To Bali? You May Have Unknowingly Eaten Dog Meat There!

Australian tourists caught as they unwitting eat dog meat sold as chicken satay.

By Justyne Yuen-Lee


 

Credit: SUN TV.  — WARNING THE ABOVE VIDEO FEATURES DISTURBING CONTENT. VIEWER BEWARE.

Australians flock to Bali, Indonesia all year long because it’s a short plane ride away to sunny skies, tropical beaches, and cheap accommodations.  Aussies young and old escape their daily lives to party in what is widely regarded to be one of the most beautiful places on earth. Sandy beaches, gorgeous vistas, a thriving surf scene, bustling streets and a bevy of charming watering holes are just part of its legendary appeal.

Naturally, when traveling to a seaside destination most of us love to maximize our time at the beach in an attempt to soak up as much sunlight as possible. Of course, easily sharable snacks like chips, fruit and of course, satay and skewers are all too often a part of the ideal beachside equation.

But could it be that you might not be getting exactly what you ordered?

This week, Sun TV reported on claims made by Animals Australia, an NGO that conducted a month-long investigation into the practices of how some street food vendors acquire their product, which found evidence that tourists are unknowingly eating dog meat which is being sold as chicken satay. This investigation into “Bali’s hidden meat trade” warns tourists to be wary of what they’re really eating.

According to the NGO, approximately 100,000 stray dogs are caught and killed for consumption every year in Bali using unsanitary and often unimaginatively cruel methods.

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Credit: Instagram / @natnatow

While the Balinese, who are a primarily Hindu culture, do not have a tradition of eating dogs, the practice was purportedly brought to the island by people who moved here from other parts of Indonesia and wider parts of Asia. In recent years the dog meat trade has increased because dog catchers have started stealing dogs to sell to dog meat vendors for extra income. According to Animal Australia’s investigators, much of the practice is “brutal” and many of the dogs literally screamed as they were being caught.

There are currently no laws in Bali that prohibit the eating of dog meat. Animal rights organizations are attempting to organize negotiations with the Bali government to urge them to end the trade.